Friday, February 27, 2015

Case Study No. 1872: Captain Librarian and the League of Librarians

Captain Librarian and the Founding of Library Science
5:42
IST 511 Fall 2011 assignment - You Need a Graduate Degree For That?

Jessica Gavin, Darren Glenn, Jake Hare, Chubing Hong, Rachel Lee, Kathleen McClure.

Thank you to everyone who helped make this possible! :)

Music Credits at the end.
Tags: IST511 Fall2011 Graduate Degree yt3d:metadata=user
Added: 3 years ago
From: rachjlee89
Views: 278

[scene opens with three "super villains" beating up a young male patron, when the female librarian super hero (long black hair, black sweater vest, sparkly gold blouse, red elbow-length gloves and nylons) bursts in through the door and confronts them]
NARRATOR: Captain Librarian, one of the world's most beloved heroes. Everyone knows the tale of her daring exploits ... but it is few who know the tale that changed everything.
[they surround her and start beating her up]
NARRATOR: This is the story of the founding of Library Science.
[she "hulks up" and throws them all off in one move, as the camera focuses on one of the villains (white wig, white face paint, white gloves, white pants suit) landing on a nearby couch]
NARRATOR: White Out ...
[cut to another villain (sunglasses, black mask covering his mouth, black gloves, black sweater and pants) landing on the ground]
NARRATOR: The Censor ...
[cut to the last villain (striped bandana around her forehead, striped shirt, blue jeans) landing in a "ninja" pose]
NARRATOR: And Captain Jack-That-File ...
[she looks over at White Out, who points her finger at Captain Librarian]
NARRATOR: Three of Captain Librarian's most deadly arch-enemies, joining forces to take down Captain Librarian once and for all.
[Captain Jack-That-File takes out a plastic knife and charages Captain Librarian, who gets into a slap fight before pushing her away]
[cut to Captain Jack-That-File pulling out another knife and charging again, but the librarian grabs her arms and throws her off camera]
[cut to The Censor, as he grabs a punch thrown by Captain Librarian ... but then misses a bunch of his own, as the librarian elbows him in the stomach and then kicks him while he's down]
[cut to The Censor on the ground, as he slowly gets up and comes at the librarian from behind, but she grabs him (without even looking) and throws him back to the ground]
[cut to White Out as she slowly approaches the librarian (with her look of confidence on her face) ... but then the scene gets scrambled, and cut to the three villains all lying in a heap on the floor]
NARRATOR: The day was hers. The battle was the toughest she had fought yet, and left her anxious and leery ...
[cut to the librarian striking a dramatic pose outside of the library]
NARRATOR: Captain Librarian realized that she could no longer fight the evils of the world on her own. She contemplated for many days ... Finally, inspiration struck. She could change the world, with help.
[cut to Captain Librarian (in her "regular" librarian outfit) speaking to a group of people in a conference room]
NARRATOR: Captain Librarian called together the world's greatest minds, the top librarians, to share her vision.
[the camera pans around the room, as dramatic music plays and Captain Librarian continues giving her speech]
NARRATOR: She told them that it was not enough for them to be passive, but they were going to have to let loose. Get more radical.
[she walks over to a whiteboard and points to the message written there ("The mission of librarians is to improve society through faciliating knowledge creation")]
NARRATOR: They were not desk clerks, but heroes. And they had a mission.
[the camera pans around the room again]
NARRATOR: They saw the wisdom in Captain Librarian's words. This was a job that no one could nor should do alone. Their first action was to create a Library Special Forces, the foot soldiers and future of new librarianship. This was the beginning of Library Science.
[the camera focuses on a male and female librarian ("Schmedienne" and "Super Librarian"), as they turn to each other and nod before removing their glasses]
NARRATOR: From that day, the Council forever shed their mild-mannered alter egos and became ... The League of Librarians.
[cut to black and white footage of Captain Librarian speaking directly to the camera]
CAPTAIN LIBRARIAN: Greetings, future heroes. You are here because you are the best and the brightest. The ambitious hunters, the skilled seekers, and you feel compelled to use your copious talents for the good of humanity. As a librarian, you will face many trials and tribulations, villains in many forms. The training you will receive here at ...
[she moves her lips, but someone else saying "Syracuse University" is dubbed in]
CAPTAIN LIBRARIAN: Will prepare you for the challenges you will face. A Master's in Library Science is more than just a degree. It is the calling to fight against injustice and ignorance. Remember, you are not your building, you are not your books. You are a seeker, a finder, a librarian. The library is where you are, and this world needs you!

Directed by
Darren Glenn

Written by
Kathleen McClure & Rachel Lee

Based on characters created by
Kathleen McClure

Produced by
Team Awesome

Executive Producer
Rachel Lee

Edited by
Rachel Lee
Kathleen McClure

Visual Effects Supervisor
Rachel Lee

Jessica Gavin
Kathleen McClure
Chubing Hong
Jake Hare

Team Awesome
presents

In association with
IST511 Fall 2011

A Darren Glenn film

Captain Librarian
and the
Founding of Library Science

Cast

Captain Librarian/Paige Turner ... Jessica Gavin
The Narrator ... Darren Glenn
White Out ... Kathleen McClure
Censor ... Jake Hare
Captain Jack that File ... Chubing Hong
Kid getting the tar beat outta him ... Topher Lawton
School Librarian/Schmedienne ... Rachel Lee
Librarian/Super-Librarian ... Darren Glenn
Boy/Literacy Boy ... Topher Lawton
Girl/Literacy Girl ... Meredith Levine
The Archivist/Archaia ... Jillian Healy
Children's Librarian/Cat o' Nine Tales ... Jessica Stewart
League of Librarians Member 1 ... Jill Hurst-Wahl
League of Librarians Member 2 ... Sean Molinaro
League of Librarians Member 3 ... Mikal Salaam
League of Librarians Member 4 ... Nick Berry
League of Librarians Member 5 ... Matthew Gunby
The Page ... as itself

Director ... Darren Glenn
Assistant Director ... Rachel Lee
Executive Producer ... Rachel Lee
Writers ... Kathleen McClure, Rachel Lee
Characters created by ... Kathleen McClure
Video Editing ... Rachel Lee, Kathleen McClure
Visual Effects Supervisor ... Rachel Lee
Costume Design ... Kathleen McClure
Make-up ... Rachel Lee
Stunt Double for Captain Librarian ... Darren Glenn
Assistant to Ms. Gavin ... Kathleen McClure
Assistant to Ms. McClure ... Rachel Lee
Assistant to Mrs. Lee ... Darren Glenn
Assistant to Mr. Glenn ... Tim
Assistant to Tim ... Jake Hare

Music

"Into the Fire"
Copyright KPM Music
Performed by KPM Music
Used with Fair Use All Rights Reserved

"To Glory"
Written by Thomas J. Bergersen
Copyright 2010 Two Steps From Hell
Performed by Two Steps From Hell
Used with Fair Use All Rights Reserved

"Sons of War"
Written by Thomas J. Bergersen
Copyright 2007 Two Steps From Hell
Performed by Two Steps From Hell
Used with Fair Use All Rights Reserved

Copyright 2011 Team Awesome

Case Study No. 1871: Unnamed Male Librarian (Crime Club)

1 Crime Club Radio Show Death Blew Out the Match (Opening/Closing)
2:16
No description available.
Tags: Crime Club Raido Show Death Blew Out the Match Crime Club old time radio radio shows
Added: 1 year ago
From: CinemaB
Views: 12

["Episode 1, Death Blew Out The Match, 2nd December 1946" appears on screen, then the sound of a door opening can be heard]
LIBRARIAN: Ah, you're here ... Good! Uh, take the easy chair by the window?
[he chuckles]
LIBRARIAN: Comfortable? Good ... The book is, uh, on this shelf.
[dramatic organ music plays]
LIBRARIAN: Yes, here it is. "Death Blew Out the Match," a very absorbing story of death and mystery on a small island. Let's look at it under the reading lamp ... "It was an evening early in May, and the waters around the cape just off the coast of Massachusetts where buried under a fog as thick and as massive as any you'd want to see. Moving cautiously, a small boat makes its way slowly toward one of the islands off the cape. In the boat there are Elijah McCumber and Anne Walgreen."
["Conclusion" appears on screen]
LIBRARIAN: And so closes tonight's Crime Club book, "Death Blew Out the Match," based on the story by Kathleen Moore Knight.
[the phone rings]
LIBRARIAN: Stedman Coles did the radio adaptation, Roger Bower produced and directed ... Oh. Oh, I beg your pardon.
[the sound of the receiver being picked up can be heard]
LIBRARIAN: Hello, I hope I haven't kept you waiting ... Yes, this is the Crime Club. Why, I'm the librarian. Yes, yes. Ah, come over a week from tonight. Good, we have a very unusual story about a murderer who was revealed by postage stamps. It's called "For the Hangman."
[dramatic organ music plays]
LIBRARIAN: In the meantime?
[he chuckles]
LIBRARIAN: Well, in the meantime, there's a new Crime Club book available this week and every week at bookstores everywhere ... Mm hmm, it's available now. Quite alright, and we'll look for you next week.

---

From archive.org:

BROADCAST: December 1946 - October 1947.

HOST: Barry Thomson as the host/librarian and Raymond Edward Johnson.

PRODUCER/DIRECTOR: Roger Bower.

30-minute murder mystery stories adapted for radio by Stedman Coles or Wyllis Cooper from based on and featuring some of the stories from the Doubleday Crime Club books.

Crime Club was broadcast by Mutual and produced and directed by Roger Bower. The post war stories were by various different authors and adapted for radio by among others Stedman Coles and Wyllis Cooper (writer of Lights Out and Quiet Please). The narrator played by Barry Thomson is the supposed curator of the Crime Club library. He speaks to the listener as if they have just arrived or phoned and requested one of the Club's books.

The telephone rings, "Hello I hope I haven't kept you waiting. This is the librarian, Silent Witnesses; yes we have that Crime Club book for you, come right over." The organ plays suspenseful music, the door opens and the librarian says, "Ah you're here, good take the easy chair by the window. Comfortable? The book is on this shelf..."

He would take the book from the shelf and begin to tell the tale. The story would end with the Librarian informing you that there was a new Crime Club book available this week and every week in bookstores everywhere.

---

From google.com:

CRIME CLUB, murder-mystery anthology, based on and featuring some of the stories in the Doubleday Crime Club novel imprint.

Broadcast history: Dec. 2, 1946 - Oct. 16, 1947, Mutual. 30m, Mondays at 8 through Dec., then Thursdays at 10; also heard Wednesdays and Sundays.

Cast: Barry Thomson as the "librarian" of the Crime Club, host of the series.

Producer-Director: Roger Bower.

Sample opening: "Yes, this is the Crime Club ... I'm the librarian. Silent Witness? Yes, we have that Crime Club story for you. Come right over." Then the "reader" (listener) would arrive, and the "librarian" would put him in "the easy chair by the window." The book was opened, and the story began.

An earlier series, the Eno Crime Club, was also composed in part from Crime Club novels.

---

From rusc.com:

Crime Club was broadcast by Mutual and produced and directed by Roger Bower. The post war stories were by various different authors and adapted for radio by among others Stedman Coles and Wyllis Cooper (writer of Lights Out and Quiet Please). The narrator played by Barry Thomson is the supposed curator of the Crime Club library. He speaks to the listener as if they have just arrived or phoned and requested one of the Club's books.

The telephone rings, "Hello I hope I haven't kept you waiting. This is the librarian, Silent Witnesses; yes we have that Crime Club book for you, come right over." The organ plays suspenseful music, the door opens and the librarian says, "Ah you're here, good take the easy chair by the window. Comfortable? The book is on this shelf..."

He would take the book from the shelf and begin to tell the tale. The story would end with the Librarian informing you that there was a new Crime Club book available this week and every week in bookstores everywhere.

---

From otrcat.com:

This Mutual series featured murder and mystery books that were actual Doubleday Crime Club imprints. There was a new Crime Club book "every week, at bookstores everywhere." Or so they said. It was certainly a natural to do an old time radio show to tantalize potential purchasers with half hour radio adaptations of the books.

The telephone rings"Hello, I hope I haven't kept you waiting. Yes, this is the Crime Club. I'm the Librarian. Murder Rents A Room? Yes, we have that Crime Club story for you.Come right over. (The organist in the shadowed corner of the Crime Club library shivers the ivories) The doorbell tones sullenly"And you are here. Good. Take the easy chair by the window. Comfortable? The book is on this shelf." (The organist hits the scary chord) "Let's look at it under the reading lamp." The Librarian begins reading our tale, and we begin another Crime Club offering let's hope it's not a burnt offering.

Raymond E. Johnson played the mild-mannered, albeit ominous, Librarian. Roger Bower produced and directed. Veteran Willis Cooper (Lights Out, Quiet Please) did some of the scripts from the Crime Club books.

---

From blogspot.com:

In 1931, The Crime Club came to radio for the first time, when some of the titles from Doubleday's The Crime Club library were dramatized on The Eno Crime Club, sponsored by Eno Effervescent Salts. The CBS Radio detective series ran from February 9, 1931 until December 21, 1932. It should be noted that Eno later sponsored Blue Network's Eno Crime Clues, but that did not have anything to do with The Crime Club -- that series ran from January 3, 1933 to June 30, 1936.

Then, in 1946, The Crime Club returned to radio as half-hour adaptations from the series in the Mutual Broadcasting System's program, Crime Club. The premiere of the show was Death Blew Out the Match, which aired on Monday, December 2, 1946, filling the time-slot previously occupied by Bulldog Drummond. This new show was a completely new start for The Crime Club on radio, and not associated in any way with the prevoius Eno Crime Club or Eno Crime Clues. The 1940s series were all broadcast on the Mutual Broadcasting System (MBS), and introduced by a mysterious host known as The Librarian.

The role of The Librarian was actually portrayed by either Barry Thomson or Raymond Edward Johnson (who is famous for his role in the Inner Sanctum Mysteries). This new radio series ran from December 2, 1946 to October 16, 1947, and is available via many old-time radio channels. About half of the episodes were authored by Stedman Coles, as only half were adaptations of Doubleday's Crime Club selections.

Case Study No. 1870: Akash the Librarian

The Librarian
2:47
Join us as we follow Akash in his daily, but never routine, life at the Malone Library.

The songs in this video are "Cool Blast" and "Airport Lounge" by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com and are licensed for my use under Creative Commons.

The other song is "Goodness" from sound snap.com.
Tags: Library Video with Akash
Added: 3 years ago
From: 7RANDOM7
Views: 1,200

[scene opens with a young male librarian (black hair, glasses, grey sweatshirt, blue jeans) sitting in one of the seminar rooms at the Everett L. Cattell Library, as he is reading a book (nodding to himself and moving his lips), when he suddenly looks up at the camera and slams the book shut]
AKASH: Well hello!
[he laughs and gives the camera a goofy grin]
AKASH: Didn't see you there, and for a moment!
[he laughs again]
AKASH: Well, welcome to the Malone University Library, where books are ...
[he bends down next to a stack of books and sniffs them, then turns back to the camera]
AKASH: Plentiful!
[he laughs again, then gets up]
AKASH: Well, follow me to a world of knowledge ... and discovery! There will also be some of that!
[he gives the camera another big goofy grin, then opens the door]
AKASH: Well, welcome ... into my home!
[cut to a montage of the librarian walking through the stacks and pulling books off the shelves (set to dubstep music), which finishes with him turning to the camera and giving a thumbs up]
[cut to another shot of the librarian pulling a book off the shelf, when he suddenly turns to the camera and puts a finger to his lips]
AKASH: [whispers] Shh! We're in a library!
[a loud crashing noise can be heard off camera, then cut to a male student on the floor covered in books]
[cut to the librarian standing over the student, as he puts a finger to his lips and shushes him]
AKASH: Shh! We're in a library!
[cut to the librarian speaking directly to the camera]
AKASH: Sometimes you can't reach a book you need ... that's when the tri-pedestaliac elevation device comes in handy!
[cut to a stepstool on the floor next to the librarian, as he uses it to reach a book on the top shelf]
AKASH: Works every time!
[cut to the librarian standing next to a fire extinguisher on the wall]
AKASH: What we have here is our local fire-putter-outter ... Sometimes, even in the library, it's important to be safe!
[cut to the librarian pulling a large book from the shelf]
AKASH: One time, I read the unabridged version of this book!
[he laughs, then suddenly gets a serious look on his face]
AKASH: Well actually, three times!
[he laughs again, then cut to the librarian running his fingers along some books on the shelf, when he pulls one out and moves it two places to the right]
AKASH: Frustrating!
[cut to the librarian standing next to a cabinet of map drawers]
AKASH: This section is where we organize some of our files. Here, let me show you!
[he tries to open one of the drawers, but it's locked, so he looks around confused before wandering off]
[cut to the librarian pointing at an empty shelf]
AKASH: These books are invisible.
[he pantomimes picking up one of the books and dropping it, as a loud crash can be heard]
AKASH: Ha!
[he then points at another empty shelf]
AKASH: These are the books that have become extinct.
[he makes an exaggerated gesture of holding his nose]
AKASH: Ew, gross!
[he laughs, then points at another empty shelf]
AKASH: These are the books that have not yet been written.
[he points at the camera]
AKASH: Maybe you will be one who will write a book ...
[he points with his other hand]
AKASH: Or you!
[he laughs]
AKASH: Or you!
[he laughs again, then adjusts his glasses]
AKASH: Well, that's all for today. I'm Akash the librarian, reminding you to read and-or write a book!
[he smiles, then uses the stepstool to reach another high book, as the scene fades to black]

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Case Study No. 1869: Lee Welch

The Other 51 Weeks: A Marketing Handbook For Librarians - Lee Welch - bluecoffeeandbooks.com
1:20
Book Summary: The Other 51 Weeks: A Marketing Handbook For Librarians - Lee Welch
ISBN: 9781876938901

Share the book of your favorite author.

See more http://www.bluecoffee andbooks.com

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Music from:
http://freemusi carchive.org/
https://www.you tube.com/audio library/music


By YuMacOc


ID: BM9781876938901-279304
Tags: book synopsis book review books in english The Other 51 Weeks: A Marketing Handbook for Librarians Lee Welch ELSEVIER SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 9781876938901
Added: 4 months ago
From: BlueCoffeeAndBooks
Views: 1

From elsevier.com:

The Other 51 Weeks
A Marketing Handbook for Librarians
by Lee Welch

Paperback, 120 Pages
Published: June 2006
Imprint: Chandos Publishing
ISBN: 978-1-876938-90-1

The title The Other 51 Weeks reflects the authors conviction that the concept of marketing for libraries goes far beyond the single week of promotional displays for Library and Information Week. There are many definitions of marketing but most come down to the same thing - it is the process of identifying and meeting client needs. Marketing is a vital building block in the process of managing and fostering our libraries. The book has an easy to follow step-by-step format to allow the reader to formulate his or her own marketing strategy. The book is intended to distil the theory and strip the hype from what is a simple but vital process that can assist todays libraries to thrive in a changing world. It puts marketing in its proper place in the librarians management tool kit.

The author has worked in public, special and academic libraries at various stages of her career, as well as the library trade sector and consultancy. As a professional project manager and consultant for over ten years, she has wide experience in identifying the needs of her clients to market and communicate effectively with their audiences. The book draws on her experience as a consultant and draws on material developed for clients by AIMA Training and Consultancy Services over many years in the field.

Case Study No. 1868: Staff of the Alachua County Library District

I AM the Library: Alachua County Library District
0:30
Find out about job opportunities at the Alachua County Library District.
Tags: public library job opportunities librarian jobs
Added: 2 years ago
From: AlachuaCountyLibrary
Views: 301

[scene opens with an older male librarian ("Nate, Cone Park") speaking directly to the camera]
NATE: Working at a branch library, I not only get to know the patrons personally, I have become a part of the community, helping to impact its development.
[cut to a young female librarian ("Miki, eBranch") speaking directly to the camera]
MIKI: Being a librarian allows me to be a perpetual learner. I sharpen my research skills and sharpen my mind with every patron interaction.
[cut to a young male librarian ("Mike, Automated Services") speaking directly to the camera]
MIKE: The library is more than just books. We can help a patron use a computer for the first time, or even reconnect with old friends through social media.
[cut to another young female librarian ("Brittany, Outreach Services") speaking directly to the camera]
BRITTANY: I enjoy helping people, so sending library materials to people that can't come into one of our branches really makes me happy.

I Am The Library
You can be the library too.

Find out about job opportunities at the library / www dot aclib dot us

---

From aclib.us:

For information regarding employment opportunities with the Library District please call the Alachua County Human Resources Department at (352) 374-5219 or review their listing of Library District job postings online.

For all jobs with Alachua County Library District other than internships, all applications are submitted online.

Case Study No. 1867: Unnamed Male Librarian (Mister Rogers' Neighborhood)

Mr. Rogers Calls Public Library
1:53
Mr. Rogers Calls Public Library
Tags: Mr. Rogers Calls Public Library Prank Call
Added: 6 years ago
From: WorldFamousPranks
Views: 11,975

MALE LIBRARIAN: Hello, [beep] Library.
MR. ROGERS: Hello?
MALE LIBRARIAN: Yes, [beep] Library.
MR. ROGERS: You know who I am?
MALE LIBRARIAN: Hello?
MR. ROGERS: You know who I am?
MALE LIBRARIAN: Uh, no I don't ... [beep] Library.
MR. ROGERS: Charles R. Aber.
MALE LIBRARIAN: [pause] Yes?
MR. ROGERS: Yes, hi. Can you find the cat?
MALE LIBRARIAN: I'm sorry, I can't understand you, sir.
MR. ROGERS: Can you find the cat?
MALE LIBRARIAN: Find the what?
MR. ROGERS: Can you find the cat?
MALE LIBRARIAN: Find the cat?
MR. ROGERS: Yeah.
MALE LIBRARIAN: Hello ... No, sir. I'm sorry, you're not making sense to me. Are you inquiring about a book?
MR. ROGERS: My grandmother Rogers taught me how to answer the phone.
MALE LIBRARIAN: [pause] Hello, sir?
MR. ROGERS: Yes.
MALE LIBRARIAN: Yeah, okay. You're not making sense to me. How can I help you?
MR. ROGERS: Do you have ways of showing you're angry?
MALE LIBRARIAN: [pause] Uh, can I help you, sir? Or do you have a book on hold here?
MR. ROGERS: Yes ... Hello?
MALE LIBRARIAN: I can't hear you, the connection is bad.
MR. ROGERS: Did you talk with the people you love last night about the things that you wonder about?
MALE LIBRARIAN: I'm sorry sir, I-I can't understand you.
MR. ROGERS: You're the coach, aren't you, for the team?
MALE LIBRARIAN: I'm sorry, what did you say? I didn't hear you.
MR. ROGERS: Have you ever seen anybody play the game called soccer?
MALE LIBRARIAN: Soccer?
MR. ROGERS: Yes.
MALE LIBRARIAN: Okay sir, this really is not relevant to our business here. I'm afraid I'm gonna have to stop our phone call.
MR. ROGERS: Bye.
MALE LIBRARIAN: Okay, sir? Alright, I'm sorry. Goodbye ...
MR. ROGERS: Bye. Bye. Bye.
[the sound of a phone hanging up can be heard]

---

From wikipedia.org:

A soundboard is a computer program, Web application, or device, traditionally created in Adobe Flash that catalogues and plays many short soundbites and audio clips. These audioclips can be taken from television shows, movies, and other pop-culture sources (notable celebrities used in the more popular soundboards include Mr. T, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Mr. Rogers, etc.). Soundboards are self-contained, requiring no outside media player.

Traditionally, builders generally take sound clips said by celebrities and combine them into one Flash creation. They are most often used in prank calls, when the caller uses the soundboard to imitate a celebrity or other well-known person. The individual on the other end of the call is usually deceived into thinking that they are actually talking to a real person. In some cases, the victim associated with the prank call has no idea who the person from the soundboard is. Some users even record the calls and post them on the Internet.

---

From realmofdarkness.net:

The best Mr. Rogers Soundboard available. Has a variety of quotes about the bible, cats, raccoons, monsters and more.

---

From wikia.com:

Fred McFeely Rogers (March 20, 1928 - February 27, 2003) was an American TV personality best known for starring as the host of of the PBS kids' show, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood from February 19, 1968 until his retirement on August 31, 2001. He was also an ordained Presbyterian minister. He died on February 27, 2003 of stomach cancer at the age of 74. Reruns of his series could be seen on most PBS stations until August 29, 2008 and some have chosen to continue airing it independently of the PBS feed.

His soundboards are some of the few that contain absolutely no profanity, insults, vulgarity or even angry content whatsoever, instead being filled with quotes delievered in the warm, friendly and gentle manner that Rogers was known for, both on TV and in-person. Nonetheless, they are very effective for prank calls, because taken out of context, he sounds to victims like a complete weirdo calling them, often resulting in the victims becoming very irate.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Case Study No. 1866: "Legends of the Library Ninjas"

"Legends of the Library Ninjas" graphic novel
1:12
Legends of the Library Ninjas: A Quest for Knowledge
Greg "Inky" Charland - writer/artist
Tags: librarians ninjas comic books
Added: 1 year ago
From: ComixLibrary
Views: 3

[the first panel shows two students enter the library]
ALLY: It's the first day of classes and we already have homework. I can't believe I have to write a research paper already!
DREW: I know, and I've never been in this library. How are we supposed to find anything?
[the second panel shows a closeup of the two students]
DREW: It's so big! I don't know where to begin.
[the third panel shows a large wooden sign materialize in front of them with a "Poof!"]
[the fourth panel shows the female student point at the sign with a look of shock on her face]
ALLY: Look! This sign says "Computers." Let's start at the computers.
DREW: [to himself] Where did that sign come from?
[the fifth panel shows the students walking up to the computer terminals]
ALLY: Here we go. Now we just need to search the online catalog to find books that can help us write our research papers.
[the sixth panel shows the male student sitting at a computer and talking to his classmate (as a gloved hand reaches in from off camera and sticks a post-it note to his monitor)]
DREW: I think I found something, but all I'm getting is some numbers.
[the seventh panel shows the female student pointing at the post-it note]
ALLY: Oh! This sticky note has your book written down and says "Dewey Decimal."
DREW: [to himself] Sticky note? Where'd that come from?
[the eighth panel shows the male student poking at the post-it note with his finger, while the female student grabs him by the shirt and tries to drag him towards the stacks]
ALLY: According to your sticky note, this Dewey Decimal thing can help us find the book we need.
DREW: I think you're right. What about the note?
ALLY: Leave it! Come on!
[the ninth panel shows the female student reaching for a book on the top shelf]
ALLY: Here's the book! The Dewey Decimal System is a way of organizing the books. It is broken up into numbered subject groups.
[the tenth panel shows the female student turning towards her classmate (as a gloved hand reaches out from the other side of the bookcase and hands her the book)]
ALLY: It's pretty easy ... If you know your decimals, you're good.
DREW: [to himself] I'm getting hungry. I wonder if I can get a cookie around here?
[the eleventh panel shows the two students looking at the book]
DREW: We found our books, but we need more references. Can we find stuff online?
[the twelfth panel shows the female student looking back at the computer terminals]
ALLY: Yeah! Let's go see what else we can find on the computers!
[the thirteenth panel shows the two students walking back towards the computers, as three shadows can be seen on the floor behind them]
DREW: [to himself] I could really go for a cookie right now.
[the fourteenth panel shows the male student sitting at a computer, when what appears to be a large knife (with a note attached to the end) is thrown from off camera and embeds itself in the keyboard with a "Thunk"]
DREW: Gaahhhh!
[the fifteenth panel shows the female student sitting at the computer next to him, as she calmly puts a finger to her lips and shushes him]
ALLY: Shhhh! This is a library.
[the sixteenth panel shows the two students examining the object]
DREW: What on earth is this?
NARRATOR: It's a kunai. A kunai is a Japanese tool possibly derived from the masonry trowel. It was used as a multi-functional weapon. It is commonly associated with the ninja, who used it to gouge holes in walls.
[the seventeenth panel shows the female student pointing at the kunai and smiling]
ALLY: Look! It says what we can find on these computers.
[the eighteenth panel shows the female student reading the note attached to the kunai]
ALLY: "Start with general keywords. You can narrow results from there. Try alternate keywords if you don't find the results you need."
[the nineteenth panel shows the male student staring blankly at her as she continues reading]
ALLY: "If you need your information immediately, you should limit your results to full-text."
DREW: Okaay ...
ALLY: "Also, each database will have slightly different information. Try more than one database! Evaluating sources can be confusing."
[the twentieth panel shows the male student with a bored look on his face, as she continues reading]
ALLY: "Library databases can be more reliable than Google or Yahoo, because you can find stuff from academic journals and peer-reviewed sources."
DREW: Uh huh ...
ALLY: "If you are using a search engine, stick to official websites that would know the most about a subject."
DREW: I see ...
[the twenty first panel shows the male student with a slight scowl on his face, as she continues reading]
ALLY: "A scholarly or peer-reviewed article is one that has been edited and fact-checked by a professional authority on a chosen topic. They can be found best in the library databases.
DREW: Yes, but ...
[the twenty second panel shows the male student brandishing kunai with an angry look on his face, as the background turns red]
DREW: It doesn't explain what this is and where it came from!
NARRATOR: It's a kunai, Drew. We told you on the previous page.
STUDENT: [from off camera] Hey, relax newbie. It's just the ninjas.
[the twenty third panel shows the two students staring at each other, as they both say "Ninjas?"]
[the twenty fourth panel shows another male student sitting at one of the computer terminals]
STUDENT: Yeah, library ninjas. They help out around here.
[the twenty fifth panel shows the student raise his hand without looking, as someone off camera tosses him a book]
[the twenty sixth panel shows the student holding out the book in front of him]
STUDENT: See?
[the twenty seventh panel shows the female student angrily yelling]
ALLY: Ninjas? Yeah right! If we have ninjas instead of normal librarians, how do we get interlibrary loans? What if the library doesn't have any books that match your topic and no access to online journals that might help?
[the twenty eighth panel shows the female student turn to her classmate and continue arguing, while he stares wide-eye at something behind her]
ALLY: The library easily finds and requests books from other libraries across the United States, depending on where the item is being sent from. It could take anywhere from a day to a month. So there can't be library ninjas ... Drew! What are you staring at?
[the twenty ninth panel shows the male student pointing behind her, as she turns and looks]
ALLY: Oh!
[the thirtieth panel shows three ninjas posing dramatically in front of them]
[the thirty first panel shows one of the ninjas handing the female student a book]
NINJA 1: I apologize that it took so long to get this to you, but it was in Nebraska. That's a far run, even for us.
ALLY: Err ...
[the thirty second panel shows the ninja bowing, so she bows in return]
ALLY: Thank you.
[the thirty third panel shows the ninja putting his arms around the two students]
NINJA 1: We can help you find more than books. We can help you find ...
[the thirty fourth panel shows one of the ninjas rappelling down a rope, carrying a stack of books in one hand]
NINJA 2: Journals, magazines ...
[the thirty fifth panel shows another ninja holding a stack of newspapers]
NINJA 3: Newspapers, periodicals ...
[the thirty sixth panel shows another ninja holding a DVD case entitled "Ninja Master"]
NINJA 1: DVDs and graphic novels.
[the thirty seventh panel shows the two students talking to one of the ninjas]
ALLY: You'll be here whenever we need anything?
NINJA 1: Yes, you just have to ask.
[the thirty eighth panel shows the male student pointing to an image of a cookie]
DREW: Like if I need a cookie?
[the thirty ninth panel shows the ninja wagging a finger in the male student's face]
NINJA 1: Don't push it.
DREW: Awww.
[the fortieth panel shows a closeup of the ninja]
NINJA 1: We have other work to attend to.
[the forty first panel shows the three ninjas standing side by side]
NINJA 1: But we'll be around.
[the forty second panel shows the ninjas disappearing in a puff of smoke]
[the forty third panel shows a plate of cookies sitting on a chair ... a kunai is stuck in the side of the chair (with a note reading "Cookies"), and a katana sword is stuck in the floor nearby (with a note reading "Now Get to Work")]
[the forty fourth panel shows the two students looking at each other and smiling, as they both say "Best. Library. Ever!"]

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From issuu.com:

Ally and Drew are on a quest for knowledge as they explore the university library in search of resources for their assignment, with a little help from the stealthy library ninjas!

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From k-state.edu:

Monday, Aug. 20, 2012

Stealth education: Ninjas, graphic novel explain library services to Salina students

SALINA -- Seldom seen, library ninjas perform heroic acts to ensure their patrons have access to information. These mythic vigilantes and their escapades are brought to life in "Legends of the Library Ninjas: A Quest for Knowledge," a graphic novel resulting from a partnership between Kansas State University Salina and Kansas Wesleyan University.

The graphic novel was co-written and illustrated by K-State Salina student Greg Charland, senior in computer systems technology, Abilene.

Charland worked with Heidi Blackburn, undergraduate services librarian at K-State Salina, and Kate Wise, associate librarian at Kansas Wesleyan, to create storyboards.

In addition to giving final approval for the graphic novel, the librarians teamed up to write the last five pages of the booklet, which include tutorials on how to conduct effect research, such as using Boolean logic, finding and evaluating sources, and using the Dewey decimal system.

Blackburn received a $3,500 Academic Excellence Award from the university for the project.

K-State Salina students will be introduced to the graphic novel during the campus' Wildcat Welcome Week activities, with a Library Ninjas party that will include the book, ninja-themed snacks, prizes and giveaways. All Kansas Wesleyan University freshmen will receive the book during library instruction day in early September, as part of Wesleyan Challenge.

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From libraryjournal.com:

Academic Librarians Get Graphic
By Meredith Schwartz on November 20, 2012

Kansas State University Salina and Kansas Wesleyan University partnered to create a graphic novel that explains how to conduct effective library research. Heidi Blackburn, undergraduate services librarian at Kansas State Salina, and Kate Wise, associate librarian at Kansas Wesleyan, worked with Kansas State Salina student Greg Charland to create storyboards. Blackburn and Wise wrote the instructional portion, and Charland co-wrote and illustrated the result: Legends of the Library Ninjas: A Quest for Knowledge.

Undead Inspiration

The comic was inspired by a similar effort at a nearby institution, Blackburn told LJ. McPherson College's Miller Library created the Library of the Living Dead comic a couple of years ago. Blackburn and Wise frequently collaborate with the creators, Matt Upson and Michael Hall, because their schools are nearby and have similar student populations. So they were excited about the concept and waited eagerly for the results.

When Upson and Hall officially presented at the Kansas Library Association Spring Conference, "We immediately asked Michael Hall if he could do" something similar for them, Blackburn said, "but he was committed to other libraries who had gotten to him first." So they turned to Charland, who was so intrigued by the project that he gave them a discount on his fee. Charland was paid out of a $3,500 K-State Academic Excellence Award grant, which also covered the K-State portion of the printing costs. Library Ninjas was printed by print-on-demand graphic novel publisher, ComixPress, and online access was set up through Issuu, so they could track analytics.

Since McPherson had just done zombies, K-State and Kansas Wesleyan chose ninjas based on a long-standing campus joke. "We joke that we have them because chairs gets pushed in and stations cleaned up but nobody ever sees anyone doing those things." Blackburn assured LJ that the ninja characters are not based on her or Wise personally.

Measuring Comic Impact

To assess the viability of the project, the librarians conducted a survey in advance, and found that 66 percent of K-State students surveyed were optimistic about using a graphic novel as a handbook, and 54 percent at Kansas Wesleyan. According to Blackburn, they found that freshmen and sophomores were extremely receptive to the idea, while juniors and seniors were not as open to it. Blackburn attributes the difference in part to the fact that juniors and seniors have more specific research needs, based on their majors, rather than library skills in general, and in part to the fact that more recently matriculated students are more familiar with graphic novels being present in their high school library collections. (K-State maintains a small graphic novel collection of its own as well.)

Kansas State Salina debuted the book at a Library Ninjas party during the campus' Wildcat Welcome Week in August, and all K-State Salina Freshman University Experience courses, as well as other introductory courses, added the graphic novel to their library instruction curriculum. It was announced on Facebook, Twitter, and the library blog. Advance copies were given to the admissions and public relations offices, the writing center, and academic advising. A display and print copies were available in the library, and a link to the electronic version on the library website. All Kansas Wesleyan University freshmen received the book during library instruction day in early September, as part of Wesleyan Challenge, a required first-year experience program. An email introducing the graphic novel was sent to the faculty and the public relations office. An announcement was made on the college's home page, and the library's, with a link to the electronic version, and it was supported by a display in the library's main case.

Afterwards, both schools surveyed students in their university experience courses to see whether the comic had been a success. Said Blackburn, "the assessment turned out much better than we even anticipated." Blackburn and Wise had expected about half of the students to successfully demonstrate the skills taught in the comic; actually, the results were higher, with over 80 percent on both campuses now able to successfully use Boolean search strings, and about 60 percent to identify the online catalog as the way to find books. Some 49 percent of K-State students could identify interlibrary loan, and 73 percent of Kansas Wesleyan students.

Not only was the comic effective, it was appealing. Some 84 percent of K-State students surveyed rated the graphic novel as "awesome" or "pretty cool", and 65 percent of Kansas Wesleyan students. About half of the students said they would refer to the comic again in future.

Neither campus showed any difference in response between the print and electronic versions of the comic. And both have seen increased traffic to the library this year, though Blackburn is careful to note that other factors mean that increase can't necessarily be correlated to the comic: Kansas Wesley added a new academic success center to the library and K-State added two new majors to the campus. And once those additional bodies get to the library, they're also behaving differently: Blackburn says "we've seen an increase in students helping themselves to our stacks, doing self-service, rather than immediately going to the desk."

There's no sequel in the works, at least for now. Next steps for the library ninjas include being "consistently implemented in our university experience courses as part of the permanent curriculum" and tracking the results over several years.